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2006 Student Design Award Winner

 View CAD drawings and program materials here.

 
Holly Murdock, Student Member ASID, Utah State University
 

The 2007 ASID Student Design Competition called on student members to develop a design concept for a camp activity center for children set in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania. Certain accommodations had to be incorporated into the design, including accounting for visually-impaired campers, achieving specific “green” standards and planning for a fully-functional living space above the activity center for the camp’s director.
 


The number of entrants was tremendous this year—nearly double the number since the award was introduced in 2005—and the competition was substantial. Holly Murdock, Student Member ASID, received the top honor from the ASID Student Advisory Council and was awarded a $1,500 prize and a complimentary trip to INTERIORS 07: The ASID Conference on Design, held March 15 – 18 in San Francisco. Murdock was recognized at the Student Awards Luncheon during the conference, and eloquently shared the vision behind her project concept with attendees. Murdock expressed, “[It is] very gratifying to be given the opportunity to design a space for children with visual disabilities—those who are impacted by design decisions, good and bad, every day of their lives.”

Murdock’s design of “Camp Colomba,” Latin for “dove,” was selected as the winner for its inventive blend of design elements for special needs campers and traditional campers, as well as its inspirational representation of peace and unity. She used a circle motif throughout the space to symbolize unity and infinity. “It creates an enduring atmosphere of safety and acceptance,” said Murdock of the motif. For the director’s living quarters, Murdock created a tranquil retreat with a palate of greens and purples that mirror the surrounding mountains. Her choice in materials and products went beyond the sustainable requirements of the project; Murdock followed LEED-CI standards for the camp design, and sustainable flooring, lighting fixtures and materials from local suppliers are featured throughout the design. A textured chair-rail on all walls serves as a guide for visually-impaired campers and a glass sculptural fountain, also designed to be touched, is the prime focus of the main activity area. Of her winning project, future projects and those of all design industry professionals, Murdock says, “Whether it is a summer camp, or a home, a health care facility or a corporate headquarters, we each have the opportunity and the responsibility to make a difference.”