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Universal Design


Presentation: "Designing User-Friendly Interiors for Aging in Place"

Wilma S. HammettPresented by: Wilma S. Hammett, PhD, FIFDA
Available CEUs: 0.2 Basic
Designation: Health/Safety/Welfare (HSW)
Subject Index: Interior Design: Universal Design (2.1)

The first of the baby boomers reach 60 years of age this year. Designers who want to get or keep this demanding group as clients must know how to design interiors that meet their changing needs without sacrificing style. Special attention to the design details of color, color contrasts, lighting, and the selection of furniture, flooring and even window treatments by the designer can significantly improve how well baby boomers and the elderly live in their homes. To design user-friendly interiors for the aging population, the designer must understand how aging eyes perceive colors, and learn to use color contrasts that work to enhance and brighten rooms and their details. Furniture selection for the elderly is not just about aesthetics and function. It is also about fit. Careful selection of furniture by the designer can compensate for the physiological changes that come with age. Using specific criteria learned in this session, the designer will be able to assess old and new furniture so that safety, as well as comfort, aesthetics and function, are all key elements in the design.

 


Presentation: "Designing for Special Populations”

DAK KopecPresented by: DAK Kopec, Ph.D.
Available CEUs: 0.2 Basic
Designation: Health/Safety/Welfare (HSW)
Subject Index: Theory & Creativity: Human Factors/Ergonomics (1.3)

Designers have made significant strides in the human environment relationship. Unfortunately, within many areas of the world Physicians, Nurses and Occupational/Physical Therapists are charged with the environmental design for special populations. However, many of the solutions proposed by these professionals are clinically based and turn the home environment into a constant reminder of the disability. Designers, on the other hand, have the skills to accommodate a disorder or condition while preserving the environment so that is doesn’t serve as a reminder of a person’s disability. Autism, Post Partum Depression, and Visual Disorders are common developmental conditions that effect one’s relationship with the environment. Through demonstrations, the presentation will show how and why designers are better suited for environmental modification for person with certain diseases of disorders.

 


Presentation: "Designing for Diversity”

DAK KopecPresented by: DAK Kopec, Ph.D.
Available CEUs: 0.2 Basic
Designation: General
Subject Index: Theory & Creativity: Human Factors/Ergonomics (1.3)

Many countries throughout the world serve as the crossroads of culture, religion, and values. Understanding aspects that influence how a person perceives and behaves within an environment can help reduce misunderstandings that might arise from the built environment. Defining diversity is difficult because it includes cultural traits, ethnic characteristics, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, and physical and mental disabilities. As designers of the built environment, we need to understand issues of diversity, and be creative in the design process in order to develop environments that support the target population’s sense of identity and core values without insult or injury.